French Armoire

So we may have an intriguing mystery building here. But first, I want you to notice, if you haven’t already, the most outstanding surface that I have seen on a piece of country furniture in a long time.
On this, architectural details include a deep cornice, chamfered paneled sides and doors, carved arcaded corners on the panels, as well as gold fan spandrels, now turned a most desirable ochre. This fascinating deep, painted surface has a green-blue body with ochre panels turning to umber, black-brown central panels softened by age, red outlining turned pink, and flanking vertical slender panels that are done with vinegar paint to resemble exotic burls, finished at top with chip carving.
All construction is mortise and tenon with pegs, as expected in period, but in this case the whole is built in two vertical halves (tell me you’ve seen this before), joined for use with two interior slender blocks that hold this all together.
You’ve probably stayed at one of those great old French hotels on the left bank in Paris. You can barely get your suitcase up the stairs. Oddly, you think, how did they get an 7.5′ tall, 5.5′ wide armoire up here? The answer is that those things are pegged together to break down into components that easily ascend to the upper floors.
The twist with my armoire is, of course, that it divides vertically to become moveable pieces.
H. 77″ w. 64″ d. 22″ $2600